All Physics Courses

-- -- Elective
Credits:
3
-- -- Elective
Credits:
3
-- -- Elective
Credits:
3
-- -- Qualifying Exam
Credits:
0
-- -- Thesis Proposal Defense
Credits:
0
-- -- Elective
Credits:
3
-- -- Elective
Credits:
3
-- -- Elective
Credits:
3
-- -- Elective
Credits:
3
-- -- Qualifying Exam
Credits:
0
-- -- Thesis Proposal Defense
Credits:
0
-- --Elective
Credits:
3
-- --Specified Science Elective
Credits:
3
-- --Unrestricted Elect.
Credits:
3
-- --Unrestricted Elect.
Credits:
3
-- --Unrestricted Elect.
Credits:
3
-- --Unrestricted Elect.
Credits:
3
-- --Unrestricted Elect.
Credits:
3
AE111*/ EC101**Advanced English/Economy
Credits:
3
AE112*/ EC102**Advanced English/Economy
Credits:
3
EC101/--#Unrestricted Elective/Economy
Credits:
3
EC102/--#Unrestricted Elective/Economy
Credits:
3
EE 210Intro. to Electrical Engineering
Credits:
3
HSS --HSS Elect.
Credits:
3
HSS --HSS Elect.
Credits:
3
HTR 311Hist. Turk. Rep. I
Credits:
2
HTR 312Hist. Turk. Rep. II
Credits:
2
MATH 101Calculus I
Credits:
4
MATH 102Calculus II
Credits:
4
MATH 201Matrix Theory
Credits:
4
MATH 202Differential Eq.
Credits:
4
PHYS -- Physics Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS -- Physics Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS -- Physics Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS -- Physics Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS -- Physics Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS --Physics Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS --Physics Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS --Physics Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS --Dept. Elective
Credits:
3
PHYS 101Physics I
Credits:
4
Vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, conservation of energy, linear momentum and its conservation, rotation of rigid bodies about a fixed axis, angular momentum and its conservation. (One laboratory session every week).
PHYS 102Physics II
Credits:
4
Equilibrium of rigid bodies, oscillations, gravitation, fluid statics and dynamics, waves in elastic media, introduction to thermodynamics and kinetic theory, sound. (One laboratory session every week).
Prerequisite:
PHYS 101.
PHYS 111, 112General Physics I,II
Credits:
3
General physics for students in social sciences. Basic principles of classical and modern physics.
PHYS 121Introductory Mechanics and Thermodynamics
Credits:
4
Introduction to mechanics and thermodynamics designed for students with advanced standing, through topics such as vectorial mechanics,equilibrium of rigid bodies, rotational dynamics, oscillations, waves and thermodynamics. Not offered to students who have taken Phys 101, or Phys 102, or Phys 130.
PHYS 125Calculational Methods In Physics
Credits:
1
Properties of elementary functions; their graphs and values at special arguments. Expansions and approximation techniques used in scientific problems. Coordinate systems; areas and volumes of basic geometrical objects.
PHYS 130Thermodynamics, Waves, Optics and Modern Physics
Credits:
4
Introduction to thermodynamics, oscillations, waves, interference and diffraction, gratings and spectra, quantization of energy and wave behaviour of particles. No cuncurrent credit with Phys 102, or Phys 121, or Phys 202.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 101
PHYS 136Introduction To Scientific Report Writing And Computing
Credits:
1
LATEX and MATLAB basics.
PHYS 142 Basic Concepts in Modern Physics
Credits:
1
Stern-Gerlach filters: probability amplitudes and probabilities for various outcomes. Compatible and incompatible observables. Resolving power and uncertainly. Filtering signals spatially (temporally) and uncertainties in resolving their wavelengths (frequencies) Uncertainty principle and the stability of hydrogen atom. Concept of simultaneity in specail relativity and applications.
PHYS 150Information and Entropy
Credits:
3
This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: Information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, Shannon entropy. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics, and energy and temperature of physical systems are handled using the principle of maximum entropy.
PHYS 177 AComputational Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Probability
From Physical to Mathematical Models; Collisions of elastic and inelastic balls; iterative function systems and fractals; mathematical features of fractals, their visualization through simulations; simulating randomness, analyzing distributions through histograms; random number generators and their statistical performance analysis; simple maps with complex behaviour; (logistic map and others) examples exhibiting chaotic behaviour; their simulation and analysis.
PHYS 180Exploring the Universe
Credits:
3
Solar system: planets and the Sun, Milkyway. Other galaxies and the Hubble’s law. Bigbang. Inflation. The first few minutes, primordial nucleosynthesis. Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. Life cycle of stars. Death of stars, supernovae. Brown dwarfs, white dwarfs. Neutron stars, concepts of general relativity, black holes, gamma ray bursts. Hawking radiation and evaporation of black holes. Dark matter and dark energy. The future of the universe.
PHYS 197Analytical Methods in Physics
Credits:
3
PHYS 198Numerical Methods in Physics 
Credits:
3
PHYS 201Physics III
Credits:
4
Charge and matter, the electric field, Gauss law, electrostatic potential,capacitance, current and resistance electromotive force and circuits, the magnetic field, Ampére’s law, Faraday’s law, inductance, magnetic properties of matter. (One laboratory session every week.)
Prerequisite:
PHYS 101, PHYS 121
PHYS 202Physics IV
Credits:
4
Electromagnetic oscillations, AC circuits. Maxwell’s equations,electromagnetic waves, light and its propagation, reflection, refraction, geometrical optics, interference and diffraction, gratings and spectra, polarization, the particle-like properties of electromagnetic radiation: photons, Bohr model and the spectrum of the hydrogen atom.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 201
PHYS 221Ther. Prop. of Mat.
Credits:
3
Elements of probability theory, Bernoulli, Poisson and Gaussian probability distributions. Random walk and diffusion. Thermal motion, molecular distribution of energy in crystals and gases, definition of temperature and the Boltzmann factor, statistical characterization of thermal equilibrium, entropy. Entropy and heat: second law of thermodynamics. Entropy of mixing. Open systems and free energy minimum principles. Applications of the equilibrium conditions: the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Raoult’s law, Henry’s law, Osmotic pressure. Ideal gases with internal degrees of freedom. Third law of thermodynamics.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 102
PHYS 301Classical Mechanics I
Credits:
3
Review of basic mathematical tools used in mechanics. Dynamics of particles and systems of particles, motion under a central force, conservation of energy and momentum, dynamics of rigid body motion. Introduction to the mechanics of continua. Relativistic dynamics.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 102 and MATH 152.
PHYS 302Classical Mechanics II
Credits:
3
Review of conservation principles, oscillations in one dimension, damped forced oscillations, non-linear oscillations and introduction to classical perturbation theory. Oscillations in more than one dimension: coupled oscillations, normal modes and coordinates. Introduction to analytical mechanics. Lagrange and Hamilton’s equations, conservation principles. Small oscillations, selected applications. Canonical transformations.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 301 or CE 241 and MATH 251. (Waived for double major students upon consent of the instructor)
PHYS 311Modern Physics I
Credits:
3
The aim of the course is to expose students to the basic idea of relativity, quantum physics and to the wide range of applications of these ideas. A survey of applications include the structure of atoms, molecules and nuclei, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, elementary particles, solid-state physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Emphasis on understanding physics of quantal phenomena and on order of magnitude estimates rather than formalism.
PHYS 312Modern Physics II
Credits:
3
The aim of the course is to expose students to the basic idea of relativity, quantum physics and to the wide range of applications of these ideas. A survey of applications include the structure of atoms, molecules and nuclei, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, elementary particles, solid-state physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Emphasis on understanding physics of quantal phenomena and on order of magnitude estimates rather than formalism.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 202 for PHYS 311 and PHYS 311 for PHYS 312.
PHYS 325Math. Meth.of Phys.I
Credits:
3
Infinite series, ordinary differential equations: solutions in closed form, power series solutions, special functions. Functions of a complex variable: calculus of residues, contour integration, contour integral representations of special functions. Linear vector spaces: vectors and matrices, the eigenvalue program. Abstract formulation of vector spaces: function spaces, expansions in orthogonal bases, The Dirac delta function, integral transforms.
PHYS 325Math. Meth.of Phys.I
Credits:
3
Infinite series, ordinary differential equations: solutions in closed form, power series solutions, special functions. Functions of a complex variable: calculus of residues, contour integration, contour integral representations of special functions. Linear vector spaces: vectors and matrices, the eigenvalue program. Abstract formulation of vector spaces: function spaces, expansions in orthogonal bases, The Dirac delta function, integral transforms.
PHYS 326 Math. Meth. of Phys I
Credits:
3
Curvilinear coordinates and tensor analysis. Further applications of complex variables: conformal mapping asymptotic methods, steepest decent, stationary phase, WKB method. Partial differential equations: boundary value problems involving the Laplace, wave and diffusion equations. Introduction to groups and group representations.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 325
PHYS 331Electronics for Physics I
Credits:
3
A treatment of the fundamental concepts of electronic circuits and circuit components to provide an adequate understanding of electronic techniques used in modern instrumentation and experimental physics: diode and transistor characteristics, transistor biasing and thermal stabilization. Small and large signal low frequency transistor models transistor amplifier circuits, field-effect transistors. Integrated circuits-operational amplifiers, feedback amplifiers and oscillators. Impedance matching. Large signal amplifiers, rectifiers and filters. (One laboratory session every week)
PHYS 380Introduction to Electromagnetic Radiation
Credits:
3
Review of Maxwell's equations, and derivation of their differential form. Importance of continuity equation and displacement current. Derivation of EM wave equation in vacuum, simple solutions and their basic properties, including Poynting's vector etc. Interaction of radiation with matter, physical basis of the index of refraction. Boundary conditions and simple discussion of reflection and refraction of EM waves from conductors and insulators.
PHYS 401Electromagnetism I
Credits:
3
Vector analysis, solution of electrostatic problems: Poissons’s and Laplace’s equations, method of images. Electrostatics in dielectric media, electrostatic energy. Electric current, magnetic field of steady current, electromagnetic induction, magnetic properties of matter, magnetic energy.
Prerequisite:
MATH/PHYS 325 and PHYS 202
PHYS 402Electromagnetism II
Credits:
3
Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves, interaction of radiation with matter: the physical origin of the refractive index, Fresnel’s equations. Multipole expansions of the radiation field: electric dipole, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole radiation. Waveguides and cavity resonators. Theory of diffraction. Electrodynamics, special theory of relativity and transformations of the electric and magnetic fields.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 401 or consent of the instructor.
PHYS 407Advanced Quantum Physics I
Credits:
3
Fundamental concepts of relativity and quantum physics and their applications to the structure of single and multielectron atoms. Introduction to mathematical foundations of quantum physics. Emphasis on understanding quintal phenomena and order of magnitude estimates. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to PHYS 311.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 202
PHYS 408 Advanced Quantum Physics II
Credits:
3
Continuation of PHYS 407 involving applications of relativity and quantum physics to molecules, nuclei, radioactivity and nuclear reactions elementary particles, condensed matter physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to PHYS 312.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 407 or consent of the instructor.
PHYS 411 Quantum Mech. I
Credits:
3
Basic postulates of quantum mechanics. Wave and matrix mechanics. The Schrödinger equation. Orbital angular momentum. Exactly soluble bound state problems. The independent perturbation theory and applications. Spin angular momentum. Addition of angular momenta, variational methods.
Prerequisite:
MATH/PHYS 325 and PHYS 311
PHYS 412Quantum Mechanics II
Credits:
3
Time dependent perturbation theory and applications. Scattering theory. Born approximation, partial waves, phase shifts and cross sections. Spin dependent scattering amplitudes. Introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 411 or consent of the instructor
PHYS 421Statistical Mech. I
Credits:
3
Review of thermodynamics. Microcanonical, canonical and grand canonical ensembles. Classical and quantum gases. Applications.
PHYS 442Experimental Phys.
Credits:
4
Review and further study of the properties of quantum gases. Second quantization. Fluctuations and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Interacting Bose and Fermi systems. Superfluidity and super conductivity. Introduction to many body theory, Feynman and Goldstone diagrams. Selected applications in nuclear and solid-state physics.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 311 or 407
PHYS 442Experimental Phys.I
Credits:
4
Review and further study of the properties of quantum gases. Second quantization. Fluctuations and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Interacting Bose and Fermi systems. Superfluidity and super conductivity. Introduction to many body theory, Feynman and Goldstone diagrams. Selected applications in nuclear and solid-state physics.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 311 or 407
PHYS 443Experimental Phys I
Credits:
4
Continuation of Phys 442 Experimental Physics I. Hall effect in semiconductors, gamma-ray attenuation, laser applications, Na-doublet wavelength separation, Fabry-Perot interferometer, coherence length, diffraction of matter waves, Stefan Boltzman law and other modern physics experiments. A quick review of computers, programming, internet, vacuum techniques, particle accelerators, passage of radiation through matter and radiation safety.
Prerequisite:
PHYS 442 or consent of the instructor.
PHYS 500 Readings in Physics
Credits:
1
Supervised reading and library work. Choice of material according to individual needs.
PHYS 500Readings in Physics
Credits:
1
Supervised reading and library work. Choice of material according to individual needs.
PHYS 501Classical Dynamics
Credits:
4
Principles of mechanics. Hamilton’s principle and Lagrange’s equations, conservation laws. The principle of least action. Lagrangian formalism: Central forces, rigid body motion, small oscillations. The Hamilton’s equation of motion, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations for continuous media.
PHYS 501Classical Dynamics
Credits:
4
Principles of mechanics. Hamilton’s principle and Lagrange’s equations, conservation laws. The principle of least action. Lagrangian formalism: Central forces, rigid body motion, small oscillations. The Hamilton’s equation of motion, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations for continuous media.
PHYS 511E-M Theory I
Credits:
4
Electrostatics and magnetostatics. Time-dependent fields and Maxwell’s equations. Multipole expansion of the radiation field. The interaction of radiation with matter. Interference and diffraction. Wave guides and cavities. Electromagnetism and relativity.
PHYS 511Electromagnetic Theory I
Credits:
4
Electrostatics and magnetostatics. Time-dependent fields and Maxwell’s equations. Multipole expansion of the radiation field. The interaction of radiation with matter. Interference and diffraction. Wave guides and cavities. Electromagnetism and relativity.
PHYS 531 Quantum Mech. I
Credits:
4
Postulates. Harmonic oscillator. Hydrogen atom. Symmetries. Angular momentum. Spin. Addition of angular momentum. Identical particles.
PHYS 531Quantum Mech. I
Credits:
4
Postulates. Harmonic oscillator. Hydrogen atom. Symmetries. Angular momentum. Spin. Addition of angular momentum. Identical particles.
PHYS 532 Quantum Mech. II
Credits:
4
Bound state problems. Approximation methods. Time dependent and independent perturbation theories. Scattering theory. Applications. Introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics and path integrals.
PHYS 532 Quantum Mech. II
Credits:
4
Bound state problems. Approximation methods. Time dependent and independent perturbation theories. Scattering theory. Applications. Introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics and path integrals.
PHYS 541 Statistical Mech. I
Credits:
4
Laws of thermodynamics and their applications. Classical kinetic theory and the Boltzmann equation. Microcanonical, canonical and grandcanonical partition functions. Ideal quantum gases. Various applications in solid-state, nuclear and astrophysics.
PHYS 541Statistical Mech. I
Credits:
4
Laws of thermodynamics and their applications. Classical kinetic theory and the Boltzmann equation. Microcanonical, canonical and grandcanonical partition functions. Ideal quantum gases. Various applications in solid-state, nuclear and astrophysics.
PHYS 579Graduate Seminar
Credits:
0
Saminars offered by faculty, guest speakers, and/or graduate students designed to widen students’ perspectives on specific topics of interest and to expand their range of scientific research techniques and publication ethics.
PHYS 679Graduate Seminar
Credits:
0
Study of selected topics of interest in physics through seminars offered by faculty, guest speakers and graduate students.
PHYS 690Master Thesis in Physics
Credits:
0
Design and completion of a research project on a topic of student’s special interest under the supervision of a thesis advisor.
PHYS 79 Graduate Seminar
Credits:
0
PHYS 790 PhD Thesis in Physics
Credits:
0
Design and completion of a research project on a topic of student’s special interest under the supervision of a dissertation advisor.
PHYS 790 PhD Thesis in Physics
Credits:
0
TK 221Turkish I
Credits:
2
TK 222 Turkish II
Credits:
2